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Open Science bootcamp in Serbia

EIFL-OA news and events - Wed, 10/04/2019 - 11:55

On behalf of the FOSTER project, EIFL Open Access Programme Coordinator Gwen Franck will lead an open science train-the-trainer bootcamp for 25 librarians from Serbia who are providing open science training at their institutions.

The bootcamp is organized by the University of Belgrade in cooperation with the University Library ‘Svetozar Markovic’, and takes place at the University of Belgrade.

Open Science bootcamp in Serbia

EIFL-OA news and events - Wed, 10/04/2019 - 11:55

On behalf of the FOSTER project, EIFL Open Access Programme Coordinator Gwen Franck will lead an open science train-the-trainer bootcamp for 25 librarians from Serbia who are providing open science training at their institutions.

The bootcamp is organized by the University of Belgrade in cooperation with the University Library ‘Svetozar Markovic’, and takes place at the University of Belgrade.

Protecting Privacy in the Modern Academic Library: An Interview with Mimi Calter

IFLA - Tue, 09/04/2019 - 20:40

A group of unviersity libraries in the United States have signed up to a new Statement on Patron Privacy and Database Access. With library resources often now accessed through third-party servers rather than on the bookshelves, it offers a set of principles for how libraries can nonetheless continue to defend the privacy of their users.

The Statement addresses issues which are high on the agenda not only in the United States but worldwide. As we approach the 20th anniversary of IFLA's own Intellectual Freedom Statement, it provides important food for thought. 

IFLA has interviewed Mimi Calter, Deupty University Librarian at Stanford, and Chair of IFLA's Academic and Research Libraries Section, to find out more about the thinking behind the Statement, and what it says.

 

 

1. In a few words, what does the Statement on Patron Privacy and Database Access say?

The Statement on Patron Privacy and Database Access grows out of general principles of protection of patron privacy that libraries have long espoused, with a focus on use of licensed databases and data services.  Libraries are trusted providers of these services, and value that role.  We commit to maintaining the same standards of privacy for our customers using databases that we have long maintained for users of physical materials. 

 

2. What prompted you and others to produce the Statement now?

We produced the statement now because we’ve seen a growing number of demands for data from the library, by the provider, “on behalf of the patron,” but without the patron’s knowledge or control.  In some cases, this demand has been direct, through contracts incorporating data use clauses that allow for broad capture and open-ended use of patron data and patron activity, or that are subject to change without notice.  More concerning, we’ve seen examples of existing accounts, that were created under acceptable data use policies or under no data use policy at all, being migrated to new platforms, with different data reuse terms, without notice.  We are committed to being attentive to these policies, and recognize that we must sometimes walk away from services that cannot meet our needs regarding privacy protection. 

 

3. For you, and the other people behind the statement, when is it acceptable for students’ data to be collected and used?

We think it is only appropriate that students’ (or other users’) data be collected and used when the individual user affirmatively permits such use.  Some users will certainly choose to share their personal data to establish accounts, to customize their experiences, to be able to save searches and the like.  But they should be making an informed choice when they to do so. 

 

4. What efforts do you take within the library to protect personal data that you hold?

I can only speak for our practices at Stanford, but our first concern is to minimize the amount of personal data that we hold for individual patrons.  We anonymize circulation records and interlibrary loan files once materials are returned, for example.  Where we do have patron data in our care, we treat it as higher-risk data, which is subject to stricter security treatment. 

 

5. What costs may there be to stricter privacy controls?

The biggest tension we see is between privacy and personalization.  We know that users value a more personalized experience, and with good reason.  As noted above we know that some users will make the choice to provide more personal data in order to achieve that.  As long as the choice is made with an understanding of the risks and with intention, it’s acceptable.  

 

6. What level of awareness is there among students about risks to their privacy?

Students tend to have a very general interest in protecting their own privacy.  At Stanford, I get questions about our privacy policies that I see as a clear demonstration of student concern.  That said, I don’t believe that most students have a full understanding of the terms of database contracts and the management of rights that are negotiated there.  They trust the libraries to protect their interests, and we are stepping up to that responsibility. 

 

7. What impact do you hope the Statement will have?

First and foremost, we hope that the statement will help clarify our concerns and interests for database providers.  By stating clearly that we require privacy for our patrons, we hope to see an end to the more egregious types of data use clauses in our database contracts, like those that are subject to change without notice.  Where we do see such clauses, we know that we will be able to point to the statement, and the support it has from our colleagues, as a reason for finding those terms unacceptable.  At Stanford, we’ve already had several vendor interactions that have been impacted by the statement. 

I’ve also been pleased that the statement has led to conversations with colleagues involved with developing privacy standards.  We’ve opened a dialogue with the team developing RA21 and I’ve been pleased to learn more about the FIM4L project. 

 

8. Do you think similar statements could be helpful elsewhere in the world?

First of all, I would welcome anyone who wishes to sign on to this statement to do so.  We’ve created a form for anyone who wishes to join to submit their details.  But yes, I do think that it would be beneficial for others to come forward with similar statements of principles.  It all adds to our global dialog. 

Global Discussions on Exceptions and Limitations to Copyright for Libraries Continue

IFLA - Tue, 09/04/2019 - 12:59

​It’s time to look back at a of week global discussions on copyright at the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO). There were useful new reports and materials, signs of consensus on all sides that exceptions and limitations are an essential part of the copyright framework, and further proof that action is needed to allow libraries to work across borders.

The World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) met from 1 to 5 April in Geneva. Bringing together senior officials from copyright offices around the world, it is the focus of efforts to bring about positive reforms for libraries globally.

This particular SCCR marked an important moment. Following the agreement of action plans on exceptions and limitations a year ago, we are beginning to see results. The next six months will be crucial.

Studies

As part of the action plans, several studies and typologies were presented by expert authors. These included typologies of copyright laws affecting libraries, museums and education, as well as background papers on museums and archives, and an interim report on education and distance learning.

The typologies seek to give an overview of how existing statutes define relevant exceptions and limitations in order to allow for comparisons. The library typology, by Professor Kenneth Crews, analyses, for example, the ways in which preservation exceptions may vary according to the activity, the (copy)rights affected, and other elements.

The typologies are a useful tool for countries looking to think through reforms, providing a checklist of questions that governments could seek to address when drafting laws. All typologies presented are available in the list of documents at the SCCR/38 meeting page.

The regional seminars

As recently announced on the IFLA website, WIPO is organising three seminars in different world regions on the topic of exceptions and limitations to copyright. These will take place in Singapore, in Kenya and in the Dominican Republic, and will bring together representatives of copyright offices from all countries in each region, as well as WIPO officials and NGO representatives such as IFLA.

At these meetings, participants will be exploring the landscape of copyright exceptions and limitations in their region, and whether they allow libraries to fulfil their missions, including across borders.

The information gathered will inform discussions at an international conference on exceptions and limitations at WIPO in October, and during the next SCCR the following week.

At SCCR last week, IFLA shared its hopes for the regional seminars, and underlined its readiness to help make them a success. To do this, effective representation of libraries and other beneficiaries will be necessary, as will be a focus on copyright laws themselves.

Side events
Truths, trends and tropes: unpacking the debate around copyright exceptions and limitations

While the agenda item on exceptions and limitations moves forward, there are still some myths and miss-understandings around what these are about. At a lunch-time side-event co-organised by IFLA, Education International and EIFL, and attended by government delegates and NGOs, speakers explained why “Licenses cannot solve it all”, “exceptions and limitations do not mean the end of markets”, and “there is a need for global normative work on exceptions and limitations”.

After the introductory words of Stephen Wyber (IFLA), Nikola Wachter (Education International) and George Tebagana, Second Secretary of the Permanent Mission of Uganda, speakers shared both theory and examples to fight the above statements. Presentations were given by Teresa Hackett (EIFL), Victoria Owen (CFLA), Teresa Nobre (COMMUNIA) and Luis Villarroel (Corporación Innovarte). Four students of the University of Toronto, Joy Ramlogan, Fuschia Norwich, Amal Hussein and Lubnaa Jaumbally illustrated the points with very interesting personal examples.

The power point presentation is available for download.

Archives and Copyright: Access to Our Documentary Heritage

On Tuesday, a side-event organised by the International Council on Archives looked into archives and copyright. Speakers talked about what makes archival material special, and the challenge of orphan works, extended collective licensing and archives (and why not everything can be licensed).

Cauê Oliveira, form the Permanent mission of Brazil to the WTO, shared the example of the sad loss of archival material in Brazil during the National Museum’s fire in 2018, and how a better copyright system could have saved material through preservation efforts, and could gather existing digital reproductions spread around the world.  

More information on these side events is available on our webiste.

Other agenda items

Although exceptions and limitations took two full days of the week, other items were also discussed.

Discussions continued around the draft broadcasting treaty, which has not yet gathered enough consensus on the basic elements for an international conference (where a Treaty might finally be signed) to be organised. Discussions will continue at the next SCCR, where libraries will insist on the need for adequate exceptions and limitations.

The Secretariat also gave an update about progress on the study on copyright in the digital environment (now focused on music), whose results will be presented at the next SCCR. Other items starting to be discussed are copyright for theatre directors, and re-sale rights.

IFLA delivered several statements on behalf of the library sector. You can check them on the page Statements at the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) under SCCR38.

The livestream of the meeting is also available on the WIPO website.  

გარდაიცვალა ეროვნული ბიბლიოთეკის თანამშრომელი ფერიდე კვაჭანტირაძე

გარდაიცვალა ეროვნული ბიბლიოთეკის თანამშრომელი ფერიდე კვაჭანტირაძე

საქართველოს პარლამენტის ეროვნული ბიბლიოთეკა ღრმა მწუხარებით იუწყება ღვაწლმოსილი თანამშრომლის ფერიდე კვაჭანტირაძის გარდაცვალებას და უსამძიმრებს მის ოჯახს.

სრული ტექსტი

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Enhancing open science in West, Central Africa

EIFL - FOSS news - Mon, 08/04/2019 - 12:25

Libraries and regional and national Research and Education Networks (RENs) in West and Central Africa have endorsed a template for a Terms of Reference (ToR) for joint activities through which the library and REN communities can advance open science and open access in the region.

Enhancing open science in West, Central Africa

EIFL news and events - Mon, 08/04/2019 - 12:25

Libraries and regional and national Research and Education Networks (RENs) in West and Central Africa have endorsed a template for a Terms of Reference (ToR) for joint activities through which the library and REN communities can advance open science and open access in the region.

Enhancing open science in West, Central Africa

EIFL-OA news and events - Mon, 08/04/2019 - 12:25

Libraries and regional and national Research and Education Networks (RENs) in West and Central Africa have endorsed a template for a Terms of Reference (ToR) for joint activities through which the library and REN communities can advance open science and open access in the region.

Enhancing open science in West, Central Africa

EIFL-OA news and events - Mon, 08/04/2019 - 12:25

Libraries and regional and national Research and Education Networks (RENs) in West and Central Africa have endorsed a template for a Terms of Reference (ToR) for joint activities through which the library and REN communities can advance open science and open access in the region.

Training skills workshop for public librarians from Uganda and Zambia

EIFL - FOSS news - Mon, 08/04/2019 - 11:39

Fifteen public librarians from Zambia (11) and Uganda (4) will attend an EIFL training-of-trainers workshop to enable them to train their fellow librarians.

In addition to learning practical training and facilitation skills, the librarians will receive guidance in adapting training resources developed by the EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme (EIFL-PLIP) to suit their local contexts. The resources cover a variety of topics related to public library service innovation.

Training skills workshop for public librarians from Uganda and Zambia

EIFL news and events - Mon, 08/04/2019 - 11:39

Fifteen public librarians from Zambia (11) and Uganda (4) will attend an EIFL training-of-trainers workshop to enable them to train their fellow librarians.

In addition to learning practical training and facilitation skills, the librarians will receive guidance in adapting training resources developed by the EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme (EIFL-PLIP) to suit their local contexts. The resources cover a variety of topics related to public library service innovation.

Training skills workshop for public librarians from Uganda and Zambia

EIFL-OA news and events - Mon, 08/04/2019 - 11:39

Fifteen public librarians from Zambia (11) and Uganda (4) will attend an EIFL training-of-trainers workshop to enable them to train their fellow librarians.

In addition to learning practical training and facilitation skills, the librarians will receive guidance in adapting training resources developed by the EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme (EIFL-PLIP) to suit their local contexts. The resources cover a variety of topics related to public library service innovation.

Training skills workshop for public librarians from Uganda and Zambia

EIFL-OA news and events - Mon, 08/04/2019 - 11:39

Fifteen public librarians from Zambia (11) and Uganda (4) will attend an EIFL training-of-trainers workshop to enable them to train their fellow librarians.

In addition to learning practical training and facilitation skills, the librarians will receive guidance in adapting training resources developed by the EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme (EIFL-PLIP) to suit their local contexts. The resources cover a variety of topics related to public library service innovation.

AVAILABLE: The 2018 DuraSpace Annual Report

DSpace news - Fri, 05/04/2019 - 18:03

The 2018 DuraSpace Annual Report is now available with an overview of accomplishments, finances, and global membership. Download the Annual Report here.

With your support our organization took significant steps forward in 2018.

DuraSpace and the communities it serves are alive with ideas and innovation. Our team strives to meet the needs of the ever-expanding scholarly ecosystem that connects us all. Our international community of practitioners, strategic partners, and service providers continued to contribute to the growth, advances and adoption rate of DSpace, Fedora and VIVO in 2018. In addition, DuraSpace hosted services growth is lowering the barrier of entry for organizations who want to deploy open source technologies with the assistance of a not-for-profit. We are grateful for our community’s financial support, and for their engagement in the enterprise we share as we work together to provide enduring access to the world’s digital heritage.

The post AVAILABLE: The 2018 DuraSpace Annual Report appeared first on Duraspace.org.

Libraries for Human Rights: IFLA Contributes to Italian UN Human Rights Review

IFLA - Fri, 05/04/2019 - 12:16

IFLA, working with the Italian Library Association, has provided input to the Universal Periodic Review of Italy at the Human Rights Council. The submission highlights the importance of access to information and education, as well as the rights of children, people with disabilities, refugees and migrants.

The United Nations’ Human Rights Council has a mission to monitor and encourage the respect of human rights around the world. As well as thematic reports, it also runs ‘Universal Periodic Reviews’ (UPRs).

These serve to look, in depth, at how countries are doing in respecting the conventions and declarations that make up human rights law. On the basis of a report, compiled based on contributions by countries, stakeholders and experts, a hearing takes place and recommendations are made.

You can read more about the UPR process in our blog.

It will be Italy’s turn to have a review later this year. IFLA has therefore worked with the Association of Italian Libraries, to prepare a contribution. Particular thanks go to Enrica Manenti, member of the IFLA Advisory Committee on Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression.

The comments highlight the importance of the presence of libraries in all parts of the country in order to support access to information and education.

It highlights challenges around censorship, notably the Todi case where a librarian resisted efforts to move books discussing gender ambiguity from the children’s to the adults’ section of the library. She was forced to change jobs because of her actions.

It also underlines concern about efforts to reduce funding for organisations which help refugees and migrants, which may well hit libraries.

At the same time, there are many positive examples of Italian libraries helping to deliver human rights through dedicated programmes and actions.

IFLA looks forward to next steps, and will continue to engage on Universal Periodic Reviews where possible.

Read the submission.

LIBER Webinar: Library Carpentry – Teaching Data Science Skills & Upcoming Instructor Training

LIBER news - Fri, 05/04/2019 - 09:42

Nearly all academics use research software and 69% say their research wouldn’t be practical without it. As the use of technology in research increases, libraries have a new and essential role to play. With appropriate training, libraries can effectively support the data science needs of their researchers. This is critical for the development of Open…

The post LIBER Webinar: Library Carpentry – Teaching Data Science Skills & Upcoming Instructor Training appeared first on LIBER.

ARLIS UK & Ireland - Conference 2019

IFLA - Fri, 05/04/2019 - 00:54

ARLIS UK & Ireland 50th Anniversary Conference
University of Glasgow
15-17 July 2019

In 1969 a group of committed art librarians founded the Art Libraries Society UK & Ireland. 50 years later ARLIS continues to advocate and innovate for arts libraries and their users. Celebrate 50 pioneering years, and discover how art libraries continue to innovate, by joining us at the ARLIS UK & Ireland Conference 2019 in the dynamic city of Glasgow. 

Key conference themes will include:

  • Critical librarianship and decolonising the curriculum
  • Digital librarianship and engaging with new audiences
  • Information skills training and development

To learn more you are welcome to visit the conference website, that includes the draft conference programme, booking links, travel and accommodation information, and a guide to Glasgow, one of Time Out's Top 10 Cities in the World 2019.

IFLA Releases Statement on Open Access in Intergovernmental Organisations

IFLA - Thu, 04/04/2019 - 21:37

Intergovernmental Organisations both shape the policies and priorities of governments, and inform the international debate. By going making their publications freely – and meaningfully – available to all, they can support participation and set an example to all.

Intergovernmental Organisations (IGOs) exist in almost all policy areas, not least those which matter most to libraries, such as education, culture, science, copyright and development.

Alongside key treaties, declarations and programmes, they produce key research reports and data which both supports their own decision-making, and that of their members. This work is of course paid for, primarily, by public money.

When these publications are behind paywalls, or only available in a very restricted form (for example, view-only, and without search functionality), they cannot contribute fully to public debate.

This means not only that library users are unable to use works produced with their money in their own research and advocacy (unless their library is in a position to purchase it), but also that it is not possible to view the evidence used to come to important policy decisions.

Furthermore, it is a missed opportunity to set a good example to individual governments and other actors producing research which could benefit society.

IFLA’s new statement on Open Access in Intergovernmental Organisations underlines the case for making publications by IGOs truly Open Access. To achieve this, it calls on the Member States of these Organisations to recognise the importance of effective dissemination, and to support it effectively.

It also underlines the need for the IGOs themselves to use simple and consistent licensing practices in order to facilitate the work of librarians working to give access to their works.

Read the statement.

AVAILABLE: The 2018 Fedora Annual Report

DSpace news - Thu, 04/04/2019 - 17:29

The 2018 Fedora Annual Report is now available with an overview of accomplishments, achievements, members, progress, and events. Download the Annual Report here.

2018 was a year of accomplishments as the Fedora community delivered on key technical goals while expanding international membership and working together to design and execute a strategic plan.

The technical roadmap for 2018 included two primary goals: finalize the Fedora API specification and release Fedora 5.0, which represents the alignment of the software application with the API specification. Thanks to the support of the Fedora community, we were able to accomplish both of these goals by the end of the year.

We achieved tremendous international membership growth in 2018, with seven new DuraSpace members in support of Fedora from outside the United States. These new international memberships are the result of strategic outreach and engagement efforts, including support for international Fedora user group meetings, workshops and training camps, and representation for Fedora at international conferences and events.

While we accomplished great things in 2018, there is still plenty of work to do in 2019 and beyond. According to Robin Ruggaber, incoming Chair of the Fedora Leadership Group, “In 2019, the LG will focus initially on completion of a comprehensive roadmap which will support the completion of the Fedora API framework and tested implementations but will also chart the course for other aspects of the community of vital importance to the product. This work is essential to achieving objectives in communication, marketing, fundraising, and community expansion.”

The post AVAILABLE: The 2018 Fedora Annual Report appeared first on Duraspace.org.

2019 EIFL General Assembly

EIFL-OA news and events - Thu, 04/04/2019 - 11:40

Representatives of EIFL partner consortia and EIFL staff will travel to Biskek capital of Kyrgyzstan for the 2019 EIFL General Assembly (GA), EIFL’s major knowledge-sharing event of the year.

This year’s GA is hosted by the American University of Central Asia, a non-profit non-profit higher education institution also known as AUCA.

During the three-day event, representatives of EIFL partner consortia will share their achievements, challenges and hear updates from EIFL programme managers on developments in their specialist areas.

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