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Updated: 3 hours 34 min ago

Adoption of the European Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market

Wed, 17/04/2019 - 16:43

Following the European Parliament’s adoption of the Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market on 26 March 2019, the Council of Ministers of the European Union has now also voted in favour of the text.

The text will enter into force in the coming weeks, once it is published in the Official Journal. This will be followed by a period of two years in which Member States must make the relevant changes to national laws.

Libraries in Europe have engaged strongly in shaping this important piece of legislation to ensure that it fulfils its promise of harmonising Europe’s copyright law and updating it to the digital environment. We have benefitted from the constant support of a number of Members of the European Parliament, whose work has allowed major progress to be made.

While important progress has been made for the library, cultural heritage, research sector and educational sectors, key flaws remain. Articles 15 (11 before the renumbering) and 17 (13 before renumbering) raise important challenges to the freedom of expression and freedom of access to information.

Yet discussions are far from over. Work at the national level will be essential if Europe’s libraries are to get the best out of this legislative text has to offer. IFLA, working alongside partner library and research organisations, looks forward to assisting our members in this task. Our first step will be to establish a discussion list for those involved in lobbying on the implementation of this Directive at national level, about which we will communicate separately.

Read more about what the library field has acheived - and still needs to do - in our blog onThe EU Copyright Reform: Battles Won, Bullets Dodged, and the Questions that Remain. You can find this release, as well as further resources on our publication page.

Call for nominations: Chair of IFLA Advisory Committee on Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression (FAIFE) – term of office August 2019 – August 2021

Wed, 17/04/2019 - 15:59

Dear Colleagues,

After a first call, no nominations were received for the position of Chair of IFLA’s Advisory Committee on Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression (FAIFE).

With the agreement of the Governing Board, we are now issuing a second call for nominations for an individual with the experience and expertise to play a leading role in IFLA’s work in this key area.

In line with the Rules of Procedure for the FAIFE Committee, national association members who have paid their dues for 2018 are able to make one nomination each. Interested candidates should therefore contact their national association, who received the relevant documentation on 17 April.

The deadline for submission of nominations is 6 May 2019 (12pm Central European Time). No late submissions will be accepted.

The Governing Board will then confirm the new Chair of FAIFE by 22 May 2019.

Please find more information about the work of the Committee below.

I am looking forward to receiving your response.

Yours sincerely,

Gerald Leitner
Secretary General

 

Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression (FAIFE) is an initiative within IFLA with a mission to defend and promote the basic human rights defined in Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. FAIFE provides advice to the Governing Board and Secretary General on these issues in relation to IFLA’s strategic directions, and works in consultation with other relevant IFLA professional programmes and sections.

The responsibilities of the FAIFE Advisory Committee are to:

  • advise the Governing Board on freedom of access to information and freedom of expression in all aspects, directly or indirectly related to library and information services;
  • monitor the state of intellectual freedom affecting the library and information community worldwide;
  • promote awareness of and activities related to freedom of access to information and freedom of expression;
  • encourage reflection on and activities supporting the understanding of fundamental library principles and ethics;
  • support IFLA policy development on freedom of access to information and freedom of expression aspects, directly or indirectly related to library and information services,
  • collaborate with IFLA’s advisory committees and professional units where specific expertise may be provided by FAIFE or drawn from IFLA’s committees and their networks;
  • cooperate with other international human rights organisations, and respond to violations of freedom of access to information and freedom of expression as defined in Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

 

Tragedy of Notre Dame Underlines the Need to Focus on Prevention and Preservation

Wed, 17/04/2019 - 15:11

The events of 15 April at the Cathedral of Notre Dame have shaken many, not just in Paris but around the world. For those who work in the heritage field, it is particularly heart-breaking.

While it will take time for the circumstances behind the fire to become clear, they have underlined how vulnerable our history is, even in the heart of the capital of one of the world’s most developed nations.

Clearly Notre Dame is just one proof of this, alongside the destruction of the library at the University of Mosul, the fire at the National Museum of Brazil, and far too many others.

It will likely not be the last either, but it is possible to reduce risks and increase the chance of future generations being able to enjoy our heritage.

In Paris, the bravery required to fight the fire and save so many important pieces must now be matched by persistence and dedication in salvaging, rebuilding and restoring. IFLA wishes those involved strength and courage in the work that lies ahead.

Elsewhere, it is clear that there is a need to invest time, effort and expertise in documenting, planning and preparing. Safeguarding the memory of the world is a key task for libraries and librarians, and one that IFLA is working to support. Greater support from governments – in line with the UNESCO 2015 Recommendation on Documentary Heritage – is also essential, and a focus of IFLA’s advocacy work.

IFLA Secretary-General Gerald Leitner said:

‘The damage to Notre Dame has brought back the same sadness that was felt at the pictures of damage to heritage in Mosul, Rio, and around the world. It is clear that heritage makes a strong contribution to our societies. Our efforts to protect and preserve it must be just as strong'.

Read more about IFLA’s work on cultural heritage.

IFLA World Library and Information Congress in Auckland now to take place in 2022

Tue, 16/04/2019 - 05:00

THE HAGUE, Netherlands, 16 April 2019

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) and the New Zealand National Committee announce that the IFLA World Library and Information Congress (WLIC) in Auckland will now take place in 13-19 August, 2022. This postponement will enable the WLIC to be held as planned in the New Zealand International Convention Centre (NZICC).

IFLA WLIC has a long established practice of being held in single-site convention centres. As the NZICC faced construction delays and no other single-site venue providing the same outstanding facilities was available for 2020 in Auckland, the decision was made to postpone the event.

Through this postponement, IFLA and the New Zealand National Committee will ensure that delegates from around the world have the best congress experience when WLIC is held in New Zealand for the first time. IFLA looks forward to coming to New Zealand in 2022, and will share information about plans for a new host city for the 2020 WLIC in August 2019.

Gerald Leitner
Secretary General

Inspiration in the Eternal City!

Mon, 15/04/2019 - 11:03

Join us at our Satellite Meeting in Rome 21-22 August 2019 when we will explore The evolving concept of ‘library’ and its impact on library design!

This topic will form the basis of our exciting and very practical program. We have adopted  a multi-pronged approach with a combination of exciting keynote speakers, panel sessions that highlight the work of practitioners from around the world and a workshop session on library design that welcomes all.

Delegates will have the opportunity to consider solutions for truly  inclusive libraries with their professional colleagues and to share and learn from others’ experiences

The Satellite is being  co-hosted by four IFLA Sections: Academic and Research Libraries; Library Buildings and Equipment; Metropolitan Libraries; and Public Libraries; and will be held in the  magnificent Sala della Protomoteca on Rome’s Capitoline Hill.

So join us in Rome  for our Satellite meeting before you head to Athens for the IFLA World Library and Information Congress. Registrations are now open with a special Earlybird rate offered until 15 May

We look forward to meeting you in Italy. In the interim if you have any questions please contact us

Ciao!

IFLA School Libraries Guidelines now in Catalan

Fri, 12/04/2019 - 12:58
With the translation into Catalan, the IFLA 'School Libraries Guidelines' are now available in 14 languages. And more translations are in progress.  

Availability, License Terms and Pricing of eBooks: an Interview with Rebecca Giblin

Fri, 12/04/2019 - 11:52

ELending is becoming increasingly important and is already well-established in many countries. While jurisdictions approach the lending of eBooks and other digital material in many different ways, licensing is often part of the equation. And with that, challenges arise for the library sector.

Associate Professor Rebecca Giblin, from Monash University, Australia, is leading the elendingproject.org, investigating the availability of eBooks for lending and the terms for access. She has worked with a team of scholars from data science, social research and law and collaborated with institutions across the globe.

The initial results are finally out (here and here), and provide ground-breaking evidence on availability, licence terms and eBook pricing for libraries in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United States and United Kingdom. A pamphlet with the headline results is also available for download. We were also lucky to have Rebecca at WLIC presenting some of her findings at the session “What’s up with eLending?”, available online.

We talked to Rebecca Giblin about some of the research findings:

Could you point out some of the most remarkable results in the study regarding availability of eBooks?

One big surprise was finding that bestseller new releases tended to be available to libraries for eLending very quickly – often earlier than print editions! Availability for eLending generally was also better than we had been warned to expect. In one study, looking at availability of a sample of ‘culturally valuable’ books across every aggregator operating in a single country, we found that 76% were available from at least one e-lending platform, and 51% were available from all five platforms. But that’s still considerably worse than physical availability for the same titles – 94% were available for libraries to buy as physical copies.

What about with regards to pricing?

We wanted to better understand how publishers set their eLending prices. For example, we wanted to know how title characteristics (like age, what rights libraries were actually getting for their money, and country) affected the prices that were offered. We used machine learning technology to figure out these relationships. One of the most remarkable things we found in our study of almost 100,000 books across five English language markets is that there is virtually no correlation between price and almost any of those factors! The only characteristic that really affects price is where the book is very old – in the public domain and no longer covered by copyright. Other than that, publishers seem to be setting prices entirely at their whim. 

And when comparing different jurisdictions?

One of the most striking findings across jurisdictions was the different availabilities by publisher. Take Hachette for example – the third largest trade and educational publisher in the world. Its titles were widely available in North America, but almost entirely missing from Commonwealth countries. It’s one thing to know that Hachette’s UK office has different policies to its US one – but quite another to realise that amongst our sample of almost 100,000 books, just 16 Hachette titles were available to libraries in Australia, New Zealand or the UK.

You highlight in the study that “while books are widely available to libraries for eLending, they are not necessarily accessible”. Could you explain this?

One of the really cool things we did was write an algorithm that let us estimate the original year each of the books in our dataset had been published. Obviously, older books are in much less demand than the newest ones, and we wanted to understand how that lighter demand was being reflected in publisher terms and pricing. And what we discovered is that it’s not – at all. In Australia, books that were 10 or 30 or 50 years old are being made available to libraries with the same kind of terms and same kind of prices as the very newest ones. That includes widespread use of what we call ‘exploding licences’ – time-based licences that force books to be deleted from collections after a certain period of time, even if they’ve never been borrowed at all.

Libraries obviously have limited collections budgets, and have to take into account factors such as likely circulations in deciding whether to license eBooks. Often it’s just not feasible for them to buy expensive older titles with unattractive licence terms. So we describe those books as being available without being particularly accessible.

Across all the research conducted, what differences do you observe between big multinational publishers and other (smaller) publishers?

Perhaps the biggest difference is how they license and price books across jurisdictions. Almost all of the license differences (for example, a book being licensed for perpetual access in one country and metered access in another) come from Big 5 publishers (ed. Penguin Random House, Harper Collins, Macmillan, Hachette, Simon & Schuster). And where the license terms are identical, Big 5 publishers are also responsible for most of the price differences across jurisdictions too.

You found many differences in terms of pricing by the same publisher across jurisdictions. Could you point out a few examples? What about pricing between platforms?

The price results were one of the biggest surprises – to us in the research team, but also to our library partners and the aggregators themselves! Aggregators told us that we’d find no licence or price differences within a country, because publishers wanted everyone competing on a level playing field. But in fact we found big differences for both licence type and price. More than 20% of titles had major licence differences across platforms – for example, being perpetual access from one provider, and metered access on another. And even where the licence was the same, we found some extraordinary price differences. For example, Edward P Jones’ The Known World (published in Australia by HarperCollins) was available from all five platforms, on identical 26 loan licences, for as little as $12.72 and as much as $53.22.

What are the bargaining possibilities of libraries in eBook licensing, based on the experience gathered during the study?

It took us almost a year to negotiate the rights to collect the data we’ve used in these studies, because of strict confidentiality clauses attached to some of the contracts. What we found shows us that even aggregators and publishers don’t really seem to understand all that’s happening in this space. The lack of transparency around terms and pricing means libraries can’t shop for the deals – and aggregators can’t effectively compete on price either. I think libraries can use this data to strengthen their case for more transparency.

Libraries can also ask more from publishers. We found that publishers seem to want aggregators to have the same terms and pricing for their titles – but do a pretty poor job of actually giving effect to that intention. I’d like to see libraries use the anomalies we’ve found to demand that publishers do a better job.

What is there to see on the elendingproject.org website?

So many cool things! We have released public versions of all our data, together with interactive dashboards that allow anyone to visually query it. You just need to click on the characteristic you’re interested in, and the whole thing updates live to zoom in on that. They’re lots of fun to play with and very quickly give you new understanding of publisher licensing practices – and what they might mean for you and your library. You’ll also find tutorials in how to use the dashboards, videos where we talk through the results, the written papers and more. Please visit and take a minute or two to check it out – and share with any of your interested colleagues.

What are the next steps for this research, and for your team?

Now that we’ve gathered all this new evidence about how publishers are actually licensing ebooks, we’re surveying librarians to understand how those practices are impacting their decision-making about which books to hold in their collections. After that, we’ll use all of that evidence and data as the basis for developing recommendations about how law and policy in this space should be reformed. Folks interested in following our progress should follow us @elendingproject on Twitter for updates!

PAC Workshop on Verdigris Hisotry and Deterioration

Thu, 11/04/2019 - 18:44

The IFLA Preservation and Conservation Regional Center for Arab and Middle East countries at Qatar National Library is organizing the workshop "Various Greens in Persian Paintings with Reference to Copper Green Verdigris and its Deterioration and Stabilization". The workshop will be conducted by Mandana Barkeshli.

The purpose of this workshop is to present studies on various greens in Persian manuscripts and miniature paintings, and particularly copper green verdigris deterioration and stabilization.

Program

The workshop comprises four sessions. 
Session 1: Discussion about Persian green dyes and pigments, based on historical and scientific analysis
Session 2: Green verdigris pigment and its destructive mechanisms, based on historical and scientific surveys 
Session 3: Case study to investigate the reason behind the stability of green verdigris pigments in Persian miniature paintings
Session 4:Treatments for stabilization of green copper pigments and the visual examination of greens used in Persian manuscripts from the Libray's collection

Date: 13 April 2019 

Time: 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Language: English 

Target Audience: Conservators, researchers and scientists 

Seats are limited, to register or inquire, please contact us by e-mail at: qnlpac@qnl.qa

Get Connected: Public Access Policy Toolkit

Thu, 11/04/2019 - 17:57

Connecting libraries offers a great way of bringing more people online, and providing a space where they can develop the skills and confidence necessary to get the most out of the Internet. The new Public Access Policy Toolkit looks at the different policy areas where libraries may need to advocate to make this happen.

With barely half of the world’s population using the internet and growing concerns about the risks that exist online, the need to provide public internet access in libraries has never been higher.

The goal of getting all libraries – and their users – online has been recognised for almost fifteen years, featuring in the WSIS Action Plan.

Thanks to the free access they provide, in a welcoming environment with dedicated staff on hand to help, libraries have a unique potential. They ensure that people do not face financial barriers to use the internet, and can receive the support and training they need to become skilled and confident internet users.

Yet we are far from having high-speed connectivity everywhere.

To address this, IFLA has worked through the Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries at the Internet Governance Forum to produce a policy toolkit. This provides an overview of the different policy areas where it may be necessary for governments to act.

The Toolkit is intended for libraries and library associations who can use the diagnostic toolkit at the beginning to decide on priorities. You can then use the key advocacy points to shape your own campaigning, and the additional links to find out more.

Crucially, this is a living document. We look forward to ideas from you, in particular on links to other sources which can help! Please contact us if you want to share your ideas.

Read the IFLA Public Access Policy Toolkit

IFLA Asia Oceania Regional Quarterly News APRIL 2019 issue

Thu, 11/04/2019 - 11:51

Dear friends

Time flies and we are presenting to you the fourth issue of our newsletters.

Hope you have enjoyed it so far.

~Please open the Newsletter of PDF version to access the links. ~

Thank you and Happy Reading!

Regards,

Soh Lin Li

Regional Manager

IFLA Regional Office for Asia and Oceania

 

Summary of Evaluation of Speakers in Tabular Form : Seminar on “Advancing Multiculturalism in Libraries: Partnerships and Promotions”

Thu, 11/04/2019 - 09:01
Summary of Evaluation of Speakers in Tabular Form

Seminar on “Advancing Multiculturalism in Libraries: Partnerships and Promotions”
Narra Hall 19th Floor, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas
A. Mabini St., Malate, Manila
March 8, 2019

Summary of Evaluation of Speakers in Tabular Form (PDF)


RESOURCE SPEAKERS AND LECTURES
Speaker: Takashi Nagatsuka
Professor Emeritus, Tsurumi University, Yokohama Japan
Information Coordinator, IFLA-RSCAO
Topic: A New Perspective of Public Libraries to Offer their Services to all
Members of Multicultural Society
______________________________________________________________________________________
Speaker: Dr. Rina H. Diaron
Vice Head
National Committee on Libraries and Information Services
National Commission for Culture and the Arts
Topic: NCCA-NCLIS Initiatives on Multiculturalism Promotions
______________________________________________________________________________________
Speaker: Ms. Arizza Ann S. Nocum
KRIS Library
Topic: Promoting Empathy and Peace Across Cultures through Libraries
______________________________________________________________________________________
Speaker: Mr. Reynald S. Ocampo
Program Officer
Books for Asia
The Asia Foundation
Topic: Creation, Translation and Access on Books in Mother Tongue:
Workshop on Let’s Read App by TAF
______________________________________________________________________________________
Speaker: Ms. Nelia R. Balagapo
Manager, EFLC, BSP
Topic: Knowledge Resource Network: BSP’s Program on Networking and
Collaborations
Summary

Protecting Privacy in the Modern Academic Library: An Interview with Mimi Calter

Tue, 09/04/2019 - 20:40

A group of unviersity libraries in the United States have signed up to a new Statement on Patron Privacy and Database Access. With library resources often now accessed through third-party servers rather than on the bookshelves, it offers a set of principles for how libraries can nonetheless continue to defend the privacy of their users.

The Statement addresses issues which are high on the agenda not only in the United States but worldwide. As we approach the 20th anniversary of IFLA's own Intellectual Freedom Statement, it provides important food for thought. 

IFLA has interviewed Mimi Calter, Deupty University Librarian at Stanford, and Chair of IFLA's Academic and Research Libraries Section, to find out more about the thinking behind the Statement, and what it says.

 

 

1. In a few words, what does the Statement on Patron Privacy and Database Access say?

The Statement on Patron Privacy and Database Access grows out of general principles of protection of patron privacy that libraries have long espoused, with a focus on use of licensed databases and data services.  Libraries are trusted providers of these services, and value that role.  We commit to maintaining the same standards of privacy for our customers using databases that we have long maintained for users of physical materials. 

 

2. What prompted you and others to produce the Statement now?

We produced the statement now because we’ve seen a growing number of demands for data from the library, by the provider, “on behalf of the patron,” but without the patron’s knowledge or control.  In some cases, this demand has been direct, through contracts incorporating data use clauses that allow for broad capture and open-ended use of patron data and patron activity, or that are subject to change without notice.  More concerning, we’ve seen examples of existing accounts, that were created under acceptable data use policies or under no data use policy at all, being migrated to new platforms, with different data reuse terms, without notice.  We are committed to being attentive to these policies, and recognize that we must sometimes walk away from services that cannot meet our needs regarding privacy protection. 

 

3. For you, and the other people behind the statement, when is it acceptable for students’ data to be collected and used?

We think it is only appropriate that students’ (or other users’) data be collected and used when the individual user affirmatively permits such use.  Some users will certainly choose to share their personal data to establish accounts, to customize their experiences, to be able to save searches and the like.  But they should be making an informed choice when they to do so. 

 

4. What efforts do you take within the library to protect personal data that you hold?

I can only speak for our practices at Stanford, but our first concern is to minimize the amount of personal data that we hold for individual patrons.  We anonymize circulation records and interlibrary loan files once materials are returned, for example.  Where we do have patron data in our care, we treat it as higher-risk data, which is subject to stricter security treatment. 

 

5. What costs may there be to stricter privacy controls?

The biggest tension we see is between privacy and personalization.  We know that users value a more personalized experience, and with good reason.  As noted above we know that some users will make the choice to provide more personal data in order to achieve that.  As long as the choice is made with an understanding of the risks and with intention, it’s acceptable.  

 

6. What level of awareness is there among students about risks to their privacy?

Students tend to have a very general interest in protecting their own privacy.  At Stanford, I get questions about our privacy policies that I see as a clear demonstration of student concern.  That said, I don’t believe that most students have a full understanding of the terms of database contracts and the management of rights that are negotiated there.  They trust the libraries to protect their interests, and we are stepping up to that responsibility. 

 

7. What impact do you hope the Statement will have?

First and foremost, we hope that the statement will help clarify our concerns and interests for database providers.  By stating clearly that we require privacy for our patrons, we hope to see an end to the more egregious types of data use clauses in our database contracts, like those that are subject to change without notice.  Where we do see such clauses, we know that we will be able to point to the statement, and the support it has from our colleagues, as a reason for finding those terms unacceptable.  At Stanford, we’ve already had several vendor interactions that have been impacted by the statement. 

I’ve also been pleased that the statement has led to conversations with colleagues involved with developing privacy standards.  We’ve opened a dialogue with the team developing RA21 and I’ve been pleased to learn more about the FIM4L project. 

 

8. Do you think similar statements could be helpful elsewhere in the world?

First of all, I would welcome anyone who wishes to sign on to this statement to do so.  We’ve created a form for anyone who wishes to join to submit their details.  But yes, I do think that it would be beneficial for others to come forward with similar statements of principles.  It all adds to our global dialog. 

Global Discussions on Exceptions and Limitations to Copyright for Libraries Continue

Tue, 09/04/2019 - 12:59

​It’s time to look back at a of week global discussions on copyright at the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO). There were useful new reports and materials, signs of consensus on all sides that exceptions and limitations are an essential part of the copyright framework, and further proof that action is needed to allow libraries to work across borders.

The World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR) met from 1 to 5 April in Geneva. Bringing together senior officials from copyright offices around the world, it is the focus of efforts to bring about positive reforms for libraries globally.

This particular SCCR marked an important moment. Following the agreement of action plans on exceptions and limitations a year ago, we are beginning to see results. The next six months will be crucial.

Studies

As part of the action plans, several studies and typologies were presented by expert authors. These included typologies of copyright laws affecting libraries, museums and education, as well as background papers on museums and archives, and an interim report on education and distance learning.

The typologies seek to give an overview of how existing statutes define relevant exceptions and limitations in order to allow for comparisons. The library typology, by Professor Kenneth Crews, analyses, for example, the ways in which preservation exceptions may vary according to the activity, the (copy)rights affected, and other elements.

The typologies are a useful tool for countries looking to think through reforms, providing a checklist of questions that governments could seek to address when drafting laws. All typologies presented are available in the list of documents at the SCCR/38 meeting page.

The regional seminars

As recently announced on the IFLA website, WIPO is organising three seminars in different world regions on the topic of exceptions and limitations to copyright. These will take place in Singapore, in Kenya and in the Dominican Republic, and will bring together representatives of copyright offices from all countries in each region, as well as WIPO officials and NGO representatives such as IFLA.

At these meetings, participants will be exploring the landscape of copyright exceptions and limitations in their region, and whether they allow libraries to fulfil their missions, including across borders.

The information gathered will inform discussions at an international conference on exceptions and limitations at WIPO in October, and during the next SCCR the following week.

At SCCR last week, IFLA shared its hopes for the regional seminars, and underlined its readiness to help make them a success. To do this, effective representation of libraries and other beneficiaries will be necessary, as will be a focus on copyright laws themselves.

Side events
Truths, trends and tropes: unpacking the debate around copyright exceptions and limitations

While the agenda item on exceptions and limitations moves forward, there are still some myths and miss-understandings around what these are about. At a lunch-time side-event co-organised by IFLA, Education International and EIFL, and attended by government delegates and NGOs, speakers explained why “Licenses cannot solve it all”, “exceptions and limitations do not mean the end of markets”, and “there is a need for global normative work on exceptions and limitations”.

After the introductory words of Stephen Wyber (IFLA), Nikola Wachter (Education International) and George Tebagana, Second Secretary of the Permanent Mission of Uganda, speakers shared both theory and examples to fight the above statements. Presentations were given by Teresa Hackett (EIFL), Victoria Owen (CFLA), Teresa Nobre (COMMUNIA) and Luis Villarroel (Corporación Innovarte). Four students of the University of Toronto, Joy Ramlogan, Fuschia Norwich, Amal Hussein and Lubnaa Jaumbally illustrated the points with very interesting personal examples.

The power point presentation is available for download.

Archives and Copyright: Access to Our Documentary Heritage

On Tuesday, a side-event organised by the International Council on Archives looked into archives and copyright. Speakers talked about what makes archival material special, and the challenge of orphan works, extended collective licensing and archives (and why not everything can be licensed).

Cauê Oliveira, form the Permanent mission of Brazil to the WTO, shared the example of the sad loss of archival material in Brazil during the National Museum’s fire in 2018, and how a better copyright system could have saved material through preservation efforts, and could gather existing digital reproductions spread around the world.  

More information on these side events is available on our webiste.

Other agenda items

Although exceptions and limitations took two full days of the week, other items were also discussed.

Discussions continued around the draft broadcasting treaty, which has not yet gathered enough consensus on the basic elements for an international conference (where a Treaty might finally be signed) to be organised. Discussions will continue at the next SCCR, where libraries will insist on the need for adequate exceptions and limitations.

The Secretariat also gave an update about progress on the study on copyright in the digital environment (now focused on music), whose results will be presented at the next SCCR. Other items starting to be discussed are copyright for theatre directors, and re-sale rights.

IFLA delivered several statements on behalf of the library sector. You can check them on the page Statements at the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) under SCCR38.

The livestream of the meeting is also available on the WIPO website.  

Libraries for Human Rights: IFLA Contributes to Italian UN Human Rights Review

Fri, 05/04/2019 - 12:16

IFLA, working with the Italian Library Association, has provided input to the Universal Periodic Review of Italy at the Human Rights Council. The submission highlights the importance of access to information and education, as well as the rights of children, people with disabilities, refugees and migrants.

The United Nations’ Human Rights Council has a mission to monitor and encourage the respect of human rights around the world. As well as thematic reports, it also runs ‘Universal Periodic Reviews’ (UPRs).

These serve to look, in depth, at how countries are doing in respecting the conventions and declarations that make up human rights law. On the basis of a report, compiled based on contributions by countries, stakeholders and experts, a hearing takes place and recommendations are made.

You can read more about the UPR process in our blog.

It will be Italy’s turn to have a review later this year. IFLA has therefore worked with the Association of Italian Libraries, to prepare a contribution. Particular thanks go to Enrica Manenti, member of the IFLA Advisory Committee on Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression.

The comments highlight the importance of the presence of libraries in all parts of the country in order to support access to information and education.

It highlights challenges around censorship, notably the Todi case where a librarian resisted efforts to move books discussing gender ambiguity from the children’s to the adults’ section of the library. She was forced to change jobs because of her actions.

It also underlines concern about efforts to reduce funding for organisations which help refugees and migrants, which may well hit libraries.

At the same time, there are many positive examples of Italian libraries helping to deliver human rights through dedicated programmes and actions.

IFLA looks forward to next steps, and will continue to engage on Universal Periodic Reviews where possible.

Read the submission.

ARLIS UK & Ireland - Conference 2019

Fri, 05/04/2019 - 00:54

ARLIS UK & Ireland 50th Anniversary Conference
University of Glasgow
15-17 July 2019

In 1969 a group of committed art librarians founded the Art Libraries Society UK & Ireland. 50 years later ARLIS continues to advocate and innovate for arts libraries and their users. Celebrate 50 pioneering years, and discover how art libraries continue to innovate, by joining us at the ARLIS UK & Ireland Conference 2019 in the dynamic city of Glasgow. 

Key conference themes will include:

  • Critical librarianship and decolonising the curriculum
  • Digital librarianship and engaging with new audiences
  • Information skills training and development

To learn more you are welcome to visit the conference website, that includes the draft conference programme, booking links, travel and accommodation information, and a guide to Glasgow, one of Time Out's Top 10 Cities in the World 2019.

IFLA Releases Statement on Open Access in Intergovernmental Organisations

Thu, 04/04/2019 - 21:37

Intergovernmental Organisations both shape the policies and priorities of governments, and inform the international debate. By going making their publications freely – and meaningfully – available to all, they can support participation and set an example to all.

Intergovernmental Organisations (IGOs) exist in almost all policy areas, not least those which matter most to libraries, such as education, culture, science, copyright and development.

Alongside key treaties, declarations and programmes, they produce key research reports and data which both supports their own decision-making, and that of their members. This work is of course paid for, primarily, by public money.

When these publications are behind paywalls, or only available in a very restricted form (for example, view-only, and without search functionality), they cannot contribute fully to public debate.

This means not only that library users are unable to use works produced with their money in their own research and advocacy (unless their library is in a position to purchase it), but also that it is not possible to view the evidence used to come to important policy decisions.

Furthermore, it is a missed opportunity to set a good example to individual governments and other actors producing research which could benefit society.

IFLA’s new statement on Open Access in Intergovernmental Organisations underlines the case for making publications by IGOs truly Open Access. To achieve this, it calls on the Member States of these Organisations to recognise the importance of effective dissemination, and to support it effectively.

It also underlines the need for the IGOs themselves to use simple and consistent licensing practices in order to facilitate the work of librarians working to give access to their works.

Read the statement.

First SDG Book Club Selection Available

Tue, 02/04/2019 - 22:36

The first selection from the SDG Book Club, in all official UN languages, is now online. This offers an excellent starting point to get discussions going around SDG 1 – No Poverty.

Libraries are excellent places to engage people with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), even from a young age. Indeed, it is important that the leaders of the future grow up with an awareness of the issues facing our world, and the motivation to tackle them.

This is the mission of the SDG Book Club, launched by the United Nations, in partnership with IFLA, the International Publishers Association, the European and International Booksellers Federation, the International Board on Books for Youth and the Bologna Children’s Book Fair.

The Book Club provides a short list of books in each of the UN’s official languages as a starting point for getting children aged 6-12 to think about the themes included in the SDGs.

The first selection focuses on SDG 1 – No Poverty.

IFLA President Glòria Pérez-Salmerón said:

Books have been at the heart of so many major developments, and I believe they can be at the heart of the fundamental change necessary to achieve the SDGs. The SDG Book Club is not only an opportunity to celebrate great and inspiring stories, but also to reflect on the importance of books – and the access to them that libraries provide – in making progress for all mankind.

Getting Involved

This is just the first selection – each SDG will be covered in turn, one a month.

We encourage libraries to get involved by organising their own book clubs, making displays or in other ways. The books in the selection are only an indication, and libraries (and their users!) should feel free to use the books they want in order to tackle the issues.

More information and materials are available on the SDG Book Club website.

A Unique Role - A Real Need: Libraries, Archives, Museums and Exceptions to Copyright

Tue, 02/04/2019 - 16:59

Through two events at the World Intellectual Property Organisation, IFLA helped explore the indispensable – and undisputed – role of exceptions and limitations in achieving the public interest mission of libraries.

Copyright is often highly politicised, with discussions risking being reduced to a conflict between ‘big tech’ and ‘big content’.

Yet behind this, there is general consensus on the importance of exceptions and limitations, with the only contention being around their extent and form.

Two events, in the margin of the 38th meeting of the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights of the World Intellectual Property Organisation, offered scope to explore these issues.

 

Beyond Clichés: Building a Realistic View of the Role of Copyright Exceptions

A balanced copyright system requires both rights, and exceptions to rights in order to work.

This implies, importantly, that while licences are essential for gaining access and some uses of works, especially in a digital age, they are not suitable for certain materials and certain uses.  

Presenters underlined both the role that exceptions play in allowing for non-commercial uses of works, such as preservation or lending, and the limits of licensing as an answer to copyright issues.

They also explored the value of work at WIPO in response to the growing need for solutions to cross-border uses of works.

 

A Unique Situation: The Case of Archival Collections

Archival works often consist of documents and other materials which were never created for commercial purposes, where, often, it is not even clear who the rightholder is, and where collections can be spread across borders.

This creates significant problems, given the obligations that copyright places on anyone wanting to preserve or use such works (subject to ethical considerations), despite the lack of harm that this would cause.

Speakers highlighted the need for exceptions and limitations with cross-border effect as the only viable solution. Extended collective licensing, while it can work in certain circumstances, is not appropriate for archival material.

In the meanwhile, discussions about exceptions and limitations in formal session at WIPO will start tomorrow.

Read about IFLA’s plans for SCCR.

A Unique Role - A Real Need: Libraries, Archives, Museums and Exceptions to Copyright

Tue, 02/04/2019 - 16:59

Through two events at the World Intellectual Property Organisation, IFLA helped explore the indispensable – and undisputed – role of exceptions and limitations in achieving the public interest mission of libraries.

Copyright is often highly politicised, with discussions risking being reduced to a conflict between ‘big tech’ and ‘big content’.

Yet behind this, there is general consensus on the importance of exceptions and limitations, with the only contention being around their extent and form.

Two events, in the margin of the 38th meeting of the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights of the World Intellectual Property Organisation, offered scope to explore these issues.

 

Beyond Clichés: Building a Realistic View of the Role of Copyright Exceptions

A balanced copyright system requires both rights, and exceptions to rights in order to work.

This implies, importantly, that while licences are essential for gaining access and some uses of works, especially in a digital age, they are not suitable for certain materials and certain uses.  

Presenters underlined both the role that exceptions play in allowing for non-commercial uses of works, such as preservation or lending, and the limits of licensing as an answer to copyright issues.

They also explored the value of work at WIPO in response to the growing need for solutions to cross-border uses of works.

 

A Unique Situation: The Case of Archival Collections

Archival works often consist of documents and other materials which were never created for commercial purposes, where, often, it is not even clear who the rightholder is, and where collections can be spread across borders.

This creates significant problems, given the obligations that copyright places on anyone wanting to preserve or use such works (subject to ethical considerations), despite the lack of harm that this would cause.

Speakers highlighted the need for exceptions and limitations with cross-border effect as the only viable solution. Extended collective licensing, while it can work in certain circumstances, is not appropriate for archival material.

In the meanwhile, discussions about exceptions and limitations in formal session at WIPO will start tomorrow.

Read about IFLA’s plans for SCCR.