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Updated: 3 hours 18 min ago

IFLA Releases Statement on Open Access in Intergovernmental Organisations

Thu, 04/04/2019 - 21:37

Intergovernmental Organisations both shape the policies and priorities of governments, and inform the international debate. By going making their publications freely – and meaningfully – available to all, they can support participation and set an example to all.

Intergovernmental Organisations (IGOs) exist in almost all policy areas, not least those which matter most to libraries, such as education, culture, science, copyright and development.

Alongside key treaties, declarations and programmes, they produce key research reports and data which both supports their own decision-making, and that of their members. This work is of course paid for, primarily, by public money.

When these publications are behind paywalls, or only available in a very restricted form (for example, view-only, and without search functionality), they cannot contribute fully to public debate.

This means not only that library users are unable to use works produced with their money in their own research and advocacy (unless their library is in a position to purchase it), but also that it is not possible to view the evidence used to come to important policy decisions.

Furthermore, it is a missed opportunity to set a good example to individual governments and other actors producing research which could benefit society.

IFLA’s new statement on Open Access in Intergovernmental Organisations underlines the case for making publications by IGOs truly Open Access. To achieve this, it calls on the Member States of these Organisations to recognise the importance of effective dissemination, and to support it effectively.

It also underlines the need for the IGOs themselves to use simple and consistent licensing practices in order to facilitate the work of librarians working to give access to their works.

Read the statement.

First SDG Book Club Selection Available

Tue, 02/04/2019 - 22:36

The first selection from the SDG Book Club, in all official UN languages, is now online. This offers an excellent starting point to get discussions going around SDG 1 – No Poverty.

Libraries are excellent places to engage people with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), even from a young age. Indeed, it is important that the leaders of the future grow up with an awareness of the issues facing our world, and the motivation to tackle them.

This is the mission of the SDG Book Club, launched by the United Nations, in partnership with IFLA, the International Publishers Association, the European and International Booksellers Federation, the International Board on Books for Youth and the Bologna Children’s Book Fair.

The Book Club provides a short list of books in each of the UN’s official languages as a starting point for getting children aged 6-12 to think about the themes included in the SDGs.

The first selection focuses on SDG 1 – No Poverty.

IFLA President Glòria Pérez-Salmerón said:

Books have been at the heart of so many major developments, and I believe they can be at the heart of the fundamental change necessary to achieve the SDGs. The SDG Book Club is not only an opportunity to celebrate great and inspiring stories, but also to reflect on the importance of books – and the access to them that libraries provide – in making progress for all mankind.

Getting Involved

This is just the first selection – each SDG will be covered in turn, one a month.

We encourage libraries to get involved by organising their own book clubs, making displays or in other ways. The books in the selection are only an indication, and libraries (and their users!) should feel free to use the books they want in order to tackle the issues.

More information and materials are available on the SDG Book Club website.

A Unique Role - A Real Need: Libraries, Archives, Museums and Exceptions to Copyright

Tue, 02/04/2019 - 16:59

Through two events at the World Intellectual Property Organisation, IFLA helped explore the indispensable – and undisputed – role of exceptions and limitations in achieving the public interest mission of libraries.

Copyright is often highly politicised, with discussions risking being reduced to a conflict between ‘big tech’ and ‘big content’.

Yet behind this, there is general consensus on the importance of exceptions and limitations, with the only contention being around their extent and form.

Two events, in the margin of the 38th meeting of the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights of the World Intellectual Property Organisation, offered scope to explore these issues.

 

Beyond Clichés: Building a Realistic View of the Role of Copyright Exceptions

A balanced copyright system requires both rights, and exceptions to rights in order to work.

This implies, importantly, that while licences are essential for gaining access and some uses of works, especially in a digital age, they are not suitable for certain materials and certain uses.  

Presenters underlined both the role that exceptions play in allowing for non-commercial uses of works, such as preservation or lending, and the limits of licensing as an answer to copyright issues.

They also explored the value of work at WIPO in response to the growing need for solutions to cross-border uses of works.

 

A Unique Situation: The Case of Archival Collections

Archival works often consist of documents and other materials which were never created for commercial purposes, where, often, it is not even clear who the rightholder is, and where collections can be spread across borders.

This creates significant problems, given the obligations that copyright places on anyone wanting to preserve or use such works (subject to ethical considerations), despite the lack of harm that this would cause.

Speakers highlighted the need for exceptions and limitations with cross-border effect as the only viable solution. Extended collective licensing, while it can work in certain circumstances, is not appropriate for archival material.

In the meanwhile, discussions about exceptions and limitations in formal session at WIPO will start tomorrow.

Read about IFLA’s plans for SCCR.

A Unique Role - A Real Need: Libraries, Archives, Museums and Exceptions to Copyright

Tue, 02/04/2019 - 16:59

Through two events at the World Intellectual Property Organisation, IFLA helped explore the indispensable – and undisputed – role of exceptions and limitations in achieving the public interest mission of libraries.

Copyright is often highly politicised, with discussions risking being reduced to a conflict between ‘big tech’ and ‘big content’.

Yet behind this, there is general consensus on the importance of exceptions and limitations, with the only contention being around their extent and form.

Two events, in the margin of the 38th meeting of the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights of the World Intellectual Property Organisation, offered scope to explore these issues.

 

Beyond Clichés: Building a Realistic View of the Role of Copyright Exceptions

A balanced copyright system requires both rights, and exceptions to rights in order to work.

This implies, importantly, that while licences are essential for gaining access and some uses of works, especially in a digital age, they are not suitable for certain materials and certain uses.  

Presenters underlined both the role that exceptions play in allowing for non-commercial uses of works, such as preservation or lending, and the limits of licensing as an answer to copyright issues.

They also explored the value of work at WIPO in response to the growing need for solutions to cross-border uses of works.

 

A Unique Situation: The Case of Archival Collections

Archival works often consist of documents and other materials which were never created for commercial purposes, where, often, it is not even clear who the rightholder is, and where collections can be spread across borders.

This creates significant problems, given the obligations that copyright places on anyone wanting to preserve or use such works (subject to ethical considerations), despite the lack of harm that this would cause.

Speakers highlighted the need for exceptions and limitations with cross-border effect as the only viable solution. Extended collective licensing, while it can work in certain circumstances, is not appropriate for archival material.

In the meanwhile, discussions about exceptions and limitations in formal session at WIPO will start tomorrow.

Read about IFLA’s plans for SCCR.

IFLA/PAC Training Course: Book Binding Preservation

Tue, 02/04/2019 - 13:31

The IFLA/PAC at the Qatar National Library invites all paper and book conservators and conservation technicians from libraries, cultural institutions and museums in Qatar and the Arab world to a 5-day hands-on training by Mireille Porterie, Owner of LÁtelierre Assocations for Book Binding and Restoration.

 

The training takes place 14-18 April 2019, and is free of charge. For registration or any further informaiton, please write to qnlpac@qnl.qa

 

Find the full program in both English and Arabic here.

 

 

IFLA/PAC Training Course: Book Binding Preservation

Tue, 02/04/2019 - 13:31

The IFLA/PAC at the Qatar National Library invites all paper and book conservators and conservation technicians from libraries, cultural institutions and museums in Qatar and the Arab world to a 5-day hands-on training by Mireille Porterie, Owner of LÁtelierre Assocations for Book Binding and Restoration.

 

The training takes place 14-18 April 2019, and is free of charge. For registration or any further informaiton, please write to qnlpac@qnl.qa

 

Find the full program in both English and Arabic here.

 

 

Call for papers. Announcement. The Campbell Collections

Mon, 01/04/2019 - 12:45

The University of kwaZulu-Natal (UKZN) Special Collections in collaboration with Africa Media Online and the South African Preservation and Conservation Groupe (Sapcon) are pleased to announce the call for papers, for the UKZN Special Collections: Preservation Conservation 2019. The theme for the conference is:

Disaster Prevention Preparedness, Response & Recovery of collective collections and e-collections  (digitised & born digital image).

Details are available on the Campbell Collections webpage